Local Elections England: 2024

The LGIU’s one-stop-shop for election resources.

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Ones to Watch

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Our guide to where the action will be. This year’s Ones to watch picks out key contests in the local, combined authority, police and crime commissioner and London assembly elections. We look at where things might change, control might be won or lost by a particular party or new political leaders could emerge. It’s fun to speculate, but it also matters because local authorities are the foundations of the places we live. Read Ones to watch.

On 2 May there are elections taking place all over England.

  • 107 local authorities
  • 9 combined authority mayors
  • 1 directly elected local authority mayor
  • London mayor
  • London Assembly
  • 39* Police and Crime Commissioners

For the LGIU, these elections – local elections – are the foundation of our democracy, embedded as they are in the places where we live and work and directly influencing the decisions and services that impact the most on our everyday lives. Supporting the people who make local elections happen and who uphold our local democracy, is at the heart of what the LGIU is about.

*Legislation is currently going through Parliament that will reduce the number of PCCs. If all the legislation passes there will be 36 PCC elections in May.
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In collaboration with Planet Volumes

Local Elections 101

We’ve answered your key questions about how local elections in England work. What does No Overall Control mean? What is a Police and Crime Commissioner? What is the point of local elections? Read all about this and more.

Analysis and commentary

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Who runs the councils in No Overall Control?

This is a question we are often asked, so we put together this informative article looking at how no overall control (NOC) is worked out, what it means for the running of a council and where this year’s NOC battlegrounds are. Read the article.

State of the Locals 2024

This online panel discussion, hosted with Ipsos, will bring political and local government experts together to look at what the local elections mean this year and discuss exclusive new LGIU/Ipsos polling that looks at attitudes to local democracy. There is no charge for this event. Book a place.

Want to talk to us about the elections?

We have been covering the local elections for well over a decade now and have a wealth of valuable insight. We have experts available to provide commentary and discussion across a range of election issues. Get in touch via our press team.

Running elections

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Elections issues for English local authorities 2024

This LGIU members briefing, updated for 2024, covers some essential issues for local authorities during the pre-election period. It includes This includes the publicity code, tackling discriminatory election campaigns, using data during campaigning and the position of elected members who are also campaigning for re-election. Read the briefing.

Personal safety for councillors

This short guide offers some practical tips on assessing risk and adopting strategies and behaviours that will minimise any potential hazards you might identify as part of your councillor role and while you are out and about on the campaign trail. Read the guide.

The implementation of voter ID

The 2023 local elections in England saw the first time that electoral administrators had to incorporate voter ID into the running of elections in the UK (outside of Northern Ireland). This report collected the views of those officials to discover how an already stretched service coped with another pressure. Read the report.

Transparency, trust and participation

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Global Local Executive Panel: Strategies for tackling misinformation in local government

Local government is not immune to the misinformation phenomenon – particularly at election time – and must find ways to tackle it proactively and reactively. This panel discussion will explore the challenges and focus on practical insights and ideas to counteract disinformation. This is a free event for LGIU members (there is a small charge for others). Book a place.

Essential guide to Local Election Communications

This guide is focused on some easy steps to make election communications better so that local people know where to vote, who they can vote for and how much their vote mattered in the final outcome. Read the guide

Read all about it – Councils and local journalism

This 2023 LGIU member briefing looks at the main issues affecting local journalism, with a particular focus on the impact it has on reporting local government and the situation now that many local papers have closed down. Read the briefing.

Local government essentials

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Training for your new councillors

LGIU Training provides online training sessions that will help new councillors pick up the knowledge and skills that they will need to settle into the role. We can also work with you to develop and in-house training programme tailored to the needs of your council and councillors. Find out about our training for councillors and our in-house offer.

What is local government responsible for?

Councils are responsible for a very wide range of services, many of which are statutory (i.e. they are legally required to fulfil them). Find out here which type of authority is responsible for which service.

Resources for new councillors

Our resources page collates a wealth of LGIU resources that will help the May intake to navigate the councillor role and get up to speed with subjects and ways of working that may well be new to them. Some of the content is for members only and we encourage all new councillors to find out if their council is an LGIU member. Go to the resources page.

Supporting local government every day

LGIU exists to make local democracy around the world collectively stronger, through shared ideas, resources and connections. So local government is empowered to tackle the biggest challenges we’re all facing, today and in the future.

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